Cases 661 - 670 of 670

Akhmadova and Sadulayeva v. Russia, (40464/02)

Judgement date: 10/05/2007
Date of violations: 12/03/2001
Location: Chechnya, Argun
Representative: SRJI
Violation: Disappearance

During a March 2001 sweep operation in Argun, Russian federal forces detained Shamil Akhmadov, along with at least ten other men. Although the dead bodies of four of the men were found days later outside the Khankala military base, Akhmadov's relatives searched for him for over a year. In May 2002, they found his remains, bearing signs of extrajudicial execution, in a vacant lot on the outskirts of Argun.

 

Baysayeva v. Russia, (74237/01)

Judgement date: 05/04/2007
Date of violations: 02/03/2000
Location: Chechnya, Grozny district, Pobedinskoye
Representative: SRJI
Violation: Disappearance

Baysayeva v. Russia Russian federal troops detained Shakhid Baysayev during a sweep operation in Pobedinskoe (near Grozny) on 2 March 2000. Baysayev's wife, Asmart Baysayeva, has been looking for her husband ever since. In August 2000, armed masked men sold her a videocassette containing footage of her husband's detention. Russian prosecutors opened a criminal investigation, but failed to take basic and necessary steps to determine the perpetrators of the crime. The Chechnya Justice Project submitted the videotape to the prosecutor's office with a request to identify the individuals on the videotape and question them, but never received a response.

 

Chitayev and Chitayev v. Russia, (59334/00)

Judgement date: 18/01/2007
Communicated: 24/08/2003
Lodged: 19/07/2000
Date of violations: 12/04/2000
Admissible: 30/06/2005
Location: Chechnya, Chernokozovo
Representative: SRJI
Violation: Torture

Chitayev and Chitayev v. Russia On 12 April 2000, the brothers Adam and Arbi Chitayev were detained by Russian military servicemen in their home in the village Achkhoy-Martan in Chechnya, Russia, and taken to the local police-station where they were questioned about the activities of Chechen fighters. They were later taken to the Chernokozovo detention center in north-west Chechnya. <p> During their detention both at the Achkhoy-Martan police-station and at the Chernokozovo detention center: the brothers were subjected to a range of torture methods; they were handcuffed to a chair and beaten; electric shocks were applied to various parts of their bodies; they were forced to stand for a long time in a stretched position; their arms were twisted; they were beaten with rubber truncheons and with plastic bottles filled with water; they were strangled with adhesive tape, with a cellophane bag and a gas mask; dogs were set on them; parts of their skin were torn away with pliers and more. The brothers were released on 5 October 2000, after almost six months in detention. Chitayev and Chitayev was the first torture case from Chechnya to be decided by the European Court of Human Rights.

 

Luluyev and Others v. Russia, (69480/01)

Judgement date: 09/11/2006
Date of violations: 03/06/2000
Location: Chechnya, City of Grozny
Representative: SRJI
Violation: Disappearance

On 3 June 2000, armed masked men on an armored personnel carrier detained Nura Luluyeva, her cousins and several other people at the Northern market in Grozny, where they had been selling strawberries. In March 2001, Luluyeva's body and those of her cousins were discovered among those retrieved from a mass grave in Dachny village, outside Grozny. Russian prosecutors failed to conduct a meaningful investigation. No full forensic examination was conducted on the body, and physical evidence, including clothing and blindfolds, was not saved as material evidence. (See also Magomed Musayev and Others v. Russia, judgment of 23 October 2008)

 

Imakayeva v. Russia, (7615/02)

Judgement date: 09/11/2006
Date of violations: 17/12/2000
Location: Chechnya, Shali district, Novye Atagi
Representative: SRJI
Violation: Disappearance

Imakayeva v. Russia On 17 December 2000, twenty-three year old Said-Khusein Imakayev was driving home from the market when a group of armed men stopped his car and detained him. Said-Khusein subsequently disappeared. Investigators failed to question key witnesses and soon suspended the investigation. <p> In February 2002, Said-Khusein's parents filed an application with the European Court of Human Rights. Four months later, on 2 June 2002, Russian federal forces detained Said-Khusein's father, Said-Magomed, at his home. Said-Magomed subsequently disappeared. The official investigation failed to follow leads that could help identify the officers who detained him. The Russian government later acknowledged that they had detained Said-Magomed, but claimed that he had been released the same day.

 

Estamirov and Others v. Russia, (60272/00)

Judgement date: 12/10/2006
Date of violations: 05/02/2000
Location: Chechnya, City of Grozny, Oktyabrsky district
Representative: SRJI
Violation: Extra-judicial execution

On 5 February 2000, Russian federal troops summarily executed five members of the Estamirov family in the Novye Aldi suburb of Grozny. Among the victims were a one-year-old boy and a woman who was eight months pregnant. The criminal investigation into the killings failed to secure physical evidence at the scene of the crime or conduct full forensic medical examinations of the bodies, and neglected to question witnesses.

 

Bazorkina v. Russia, (69481/01)

Judgement date: 27/07/2006
Date of violations: 02/02/2000
Location: Chechnya, Alkhan-Kala
Representative: SRJI
Violation: Disappearance

Bazorkina v. Russia On 2 February 2000, Russian federal troops detained a wounded Khadzhimurat Yandiyev at a hospital in Alkhan-Kala. Video footage of the detention submitted to the prosecutor showed how a Russian general questioned Yandiyev, and then ordered his execution. Yandiyev's mother has been looking for her son ever since. The general questioning Yandiyev was later identified as general Baranov, now commander of all Russian troops in the North Caucasus. Even though the general was identified quickly, the prosecutor's office only questioned him four years after the detention, after the ECHR had communicated the case to the Russian government. On 27 July 2006, the ECHR held Russia responsible for the illegal detention, disappearance and murder of Yandiyev. The case was the first disappearance case from Chechnya to be decided by the Court.

 

Khashiyev and Akayeva v. Russia, (57942/00, 57945/00)

Judgement date: 24/02/2005
Date of violations: 25/01/2000
Location: Chechnya, Achkhoy-Martan district, Katyr-Yurt
Representative: EHRAC/Memorial
Violation: Extra-judicial execution

On 19 January 2000 Lidiya Khashiyeva, Anzor Taymeskhanov, Rizvan Taymeskhanov, Khamid Khashivey and  Adan Akayev were apprehended by Russian federal forces in the Staropromyslovskiy district in Grozny. The district was at the time under Russian control. On 25 january, relatives found the bodies of Khashiyeva, Anzor Taymeshkanov and Akayev in a courtyard nearby the place of apprehension. In the beginning of February, Rizvan Taymeskhanov and Khashiyev were also found dead. All bodies bore signs of violent death with multiple stabs, gunshot wounds and fractures. The criminal investigation into the killings did not produce any results. No autopsies were conducted and the investigators failed to identify potential witnesses. On 24 February 2005, the ECHR held Russia responsible for the murder of the five members of the Khashiyev and Akayeva families.

 

Isayeva v. Russia, (57950/00)

Judgement date: 24/02/2005
Date of violations: 04/02/2000
Location: Chechnya, Achkhoy-Martan district, Katyr-Yurt
Representative: EHRAC/Memorial
Violation: Indiscriminate bombing

In the early hours of 4 February 2000 the village of Katyr-Yurt, declared a ''safe zone'', came under aerial attack without any previous warning. Zara Isayeva and her family hid in a cellar until the bombing subsided in the afternoon. When the shelling stopped, they   entered a minibus which would bring them out of the village through a safe exit. As the minibus headed out of the village the planes suddenly reappeared and the bombing resumed. Isayeva's son, Zelimkhan Isayev, and her three young nieces, Zarema, Kheda and Marem Batayeva, were killed as a result of the shelling. Several of the passengers in the minibus, including Isayeva, were wounded. An official criminal investigation was initiated but later closed as no criminal acts could be established. On 24 february 2005, the ECHR held Russia responsible for the killing of Isayeva's family members and for the injuries she suffered as a result of the attack.

 

Isayeva, Yusupova and Bazayeva v. Russia, (57947/00, 57948/00, 57949/00)

Judgement date: 24/02/2005
Date of violations: 29/10/1999
Location: Chechnya, City of Grozny, Staraya Sunzha
Representative: EHRAC/Memorial
Violation: Indiscriminate bombing

On 29 October 1999, Medka Isayeva, Zina Yusupova, Libkan Bazayeva and their families were traveling in a civilian convoy towards the border of Ingushetia. Approaching the village of Shaami-Yurt, the convoy was hit by an aerial missile attack carried out by the Russian armed forces. As a result of the attack, Isayeva and Yusupova were wounded and Isayeva's two children, Ilona Isayeva and Said-Magomed Isayev were killed. Bazayeva's car and possessions were further destroyed. The official criminal investigation was instigated only after a considerable delay and was later closed as no criminal acts could be established. On 24 February 2005, the ECHR held Russia responsible for failing to protect the right to life of Yusupova, Bazayeva, Isayeva and her children.

 
Cases 661 - 670 of 670